City Island Issues

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RIP DON PARDO

News

Dominick George Pardo was born in Westfield, Massachusetts, on Feb. 22, 1918, and grew up in Norwich, Connecticut. Don died Monday in Tucson, Arizona. He was 96.

The legendary Don Pardo was a radio and television announcer since the 1950s. He had been the booth announcer for the NBC network.

CLAIMING VICTORY

Other

How Crude I am, and yet-
with little care I can write
about the flowers and their
scent within the air.

My rough and ready ways mask
my love for things that bring
Peace and Joy to all Mankind.

How simple it can be to make
Peace, instead of claiming victory.

But yet, we fail to see how fragile
life can be.

With all life's pain and sorrow-
you would think Mankind would want
a Joyous tomorrow.

BY CITY ISLANDER, Jim Mullarkey

CENTER FOR COMMUNICATION

Attraction

ON LOCATION: 'Stache Media
September 10, 4:00 to 5:30 pm
'Stache Media is a full-service marketing agency that specializes in music, and provides services in advertising, publicity, digital marketing, and consumer insights. Meet the marketing minds working on campaigns for RED, a division of Sony Music Entertainment, along with brands like TOMS, Kind Healthy Snacks, Squarespace and Heineken.

Students only. Space is limited. Register using this link. Selected students will be contacted with location information.

SVA 2015 ALUMNI FILM & ANIMATION FESTIVAL

80 MUSICAL YEARS

Solution

EDDIE PALMIERI El poderoso pianista Puertorriqueño y maestro del piano y de la salsa cumple 80 años de juventud y para celebrarlo por todo lo alto el ganador de nueve premios Grammy se presentará sobre en NYC entre congas, timbales, maracas y, cómo no, sus músicos favoritos en Lincoln Center y actuar para nosotros.

https://youtu.be/pThP0_dMVm8

https://youtu.be/xwnmo0Mtnik?list=RDxwnmo0Mtnik

EDDIE PALMIERI The Puerto Rican powerhouse pianist and salsa master celebrates 80 years of youth and to celebrate it all, the nine-time Grammy Award winner will perform in NYC among congas, timpani, maracas and, of course, his favorite musicians.

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/eddie-palmieri-mn0000172612

PRAY FOR WARMER WEATHER

News

The cold war era may be a thing of the past, but the cold weather refuses to go away. Winter ends on March 19 and as far as most people are concerned, they wish it would end right now.

Some folks who are not very religious, or spiritual are praying for this God forsaken record-low temperatures to finally end. Soon others will be dealing with more snow and much colder temperatures. Forecasters say the "polar vortex" that's bringing the frigid air may decide to stay a while. This news has lots of people struggling.

RIP MAYA ANGELOU

News

American Poet Maya Angelou, author of 'I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,' dies at age 86.

M. Angelou was born Marguerite Johnson in St. Louis, Missouri, on April 4, 1928. Maya grew up in St. Louis and Stamps, Arkansas. She was an author, poet, historian, songwriter, playwright, dancer, stage and screen producer, director, performer, singer, and civil rights activist.

President Bill Clinton asked her to read a poem at his inauguration. It was the first poem read at an inauguration in 32 years.

SUNY Days for Maritime

Announcement
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SUNY Chancellor, Nancy L. Zimpher officiated at the inauguration of SUNY Maritime College president, Rear Admiral Michael A. Alfultis, Ph.D.

A great leader never takes himself too seriously and the rear admiral set a fine example by referring to himself as a frustrated preacher during his short acceptance speech.

This inauguration was the culmination of a celebration for the investiture of Dr. Alfultis as the College’s 11th president, and of Maritime College’s 140th anniversary year.

Diversity's Failure

Other

To my former colleagues in broadcast news:

This is, arguably, the biggest political story since at least 1968: the potential presidential candidacy, on a major Party ticket, of an open racist.

This article postulates that we need more journalists of color to call Trump out.
We also need more white journos to stop dealing in false equivalence, and point out the naked racist fear and white nationalism propelling Trump.

This Week in Her and History

News

This Week in History, Nov 10 - Nov 16

Nov 10, 1969
Sesame Street debuts. On this day in 1969, "Sesame Street," a pioneering TV show that would teach generations of young children the alphabet and how to count, makes its broadcast debut. "Sesame Street," with its memorable theme song ("Can you tell me how to get/How to get to Sesame Street"), went on to become the most widely viewed children's program in the world. It has aired in more than 120 countries. The show TV was the brainchild of Joan Ganz Cooney, a former documentary producer for public television. Cooney's goal was to create programming for preschoolers that was both entertaining and educational. She also wanted to use TV as a way to help underprivileged 3- to 5- year-olds prepare for kindergarten. "Sesame Street" was set in a fictional New York neighborhood and included ethnically diverse characters and positive social messages.

Nov 11, 1918
World War I ends. At the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, the Great War ends. At 5 a.m. that morning, Germany, bereft of manpower and supplies and faced with imminent invasion, signed an armistice agreement with the Allies in a railroad car outside Compiégne, France. The First World War left nine million soldiers dead and 21 million wounded, with Germany, Russia, Austria-Hungary, France, and Great Britain each losing nearly a million or more lives. In addition, at least five million civilians died from disease, starvation, or exposure. On June 28, 1914, in an event that is widely regarded as sparking the outbreak of World War I, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian empire, was shot to death with his wife by Bosnian Serb Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, Bosnia. Ferdinand had been inspecting his uncle's imperial armed forces in Bosnia and Herzegovina, despite the threat of Serbian nationalists who wanted these Austro-Hungarian possessions to join newly independent Serbia. Austria-Hungary blamed the Serbian government for the attack and hoped to use the incident as justification for settling the problem of Slavic nationalism once and for all. However, as Russia supported Serbia, an Austro-Hungarian declaration of war was delayed until its leaders received assurances from German leader Kaiser Wilhelm II that Germany would support their cause in the event of a Russian intervention.

Nov 12, 1954
Ellis Island closes. On this day in 1954, Ellis Island, the gateway to America, shuts it doors after processing more than 12 million immigrants since opening in 1892. Today, an estimated 40 percent of all Americans can trace their roots through Ellis Island, located in New York Harbor off the New Jersey coast and named for merchant Samuel Ellis, who owned the land in the 1770s. On January 2, 1892, 15-year-old Annie Moore, from Ireland, became the first person to pass through the newly opened Ellis Island, which President Benjamin Harrison designated as America's first federal immigration center in 1890. Before that time, the processing of immigrants had been handled by individual states.

Nov 13, 1982
Vietnam Veterans Memorial dedicated. Near the end of a weeklong national salute to Americans who served in the Vietnam War, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial is dedicated in Washington after a march to its site by thousands of veterans of the conflict. The long-awaited memorial was a simple V-shaped black-granite wall inscribed with the names of the 57,939 Americans who died in the conflict, arranged in order of death, not rank, as was common in other memorials. The designer of the memorial was Maya Lin, a Yale University architecture student who entered a nationwide competition to create a design for the monument. Lin, born in Ohio in 1959, was the daughter of Chinese immigrants. Many veterans' groups were opposed to Lin's winning design, which lacked a standard memorial's heroic statues and stirring words. However, a remarkable shift in public opinion occurred in the months after the memorial's dedication. Veterans and families of the dead walked the black reflective wall, seeking the names of their loved ones killed in the conflict. Once the name was located, visitors often made an etching or left a private offering, from notes and flowers to dog tags and cans of beer.

Nov 14, 1851
Moby-Dick published. On this day in 1851, Moby-Dick, a novel by Herman Melville about the voyage of the whaling ship Pequod, is published by Harper & Brothers in New York. Moby-Dick is now considered a great classic of American literature and contains one of the most famous opening lines in fiction: "Call me Ishmael." Initially, though, the book about Captain Ahab and his quest for a giant white whale was a flop. Herman Melville was born in New York City in 1819 and as a young man spent time in the merchant marines, the U.S. Navy and on a whaling ship in the South Seas. In 1846, he published his first novel, Typee, a romantic adventure based on his experiences in Polynesia. The book was a success and a sequel, Omoo, was published in 1847. Three more novels followed, with mixed critical and commercial results. Melville's sixth book, Moby-Dick, was first published in October 1851 in London, in three volumes titled The Whale, and then in the U.S. a month later. Melville had promised his publisher an adventure story similar to his popular earlier works, but instead, Moby-Dick was a tragic epic, influenced in part by Melville's friend and Pittsfield, Massachusetts, neighbor, Nathaniel Hawthorne, whose novels include The Scarlet Letter.

This Week in Her and History

Announcement
Images: 

This Week in History, February 23 - March 1

Feb 23, 1945
U.S. flag raised on Iwo Jima. During the bloody Battle for Iwo Jima, U.S. Marines from the 3rd Platoon, E Company, 2nd Battalion, 28th Regiment of the 5th Division take the crest of Mount Suribachi, the island's highest peak and most strategic position, and raise the U.S. flag. Marine photographer Louis Lowery was with them and recorded the event. American soldiers fighting for control of Suribachi's slopes cheered the raising of the flag, and several hours later more Marines headed up to the crest with a larger flag. Joe Rosenthal, a photographer with the Associated Press, met them along the way and recorded the raising of the second flag along with a Marine still photographer and a motion-picture cameraman.

Feb 24, 1836
Alamo defenders call for help. On this day in 1836, in San Antonio, Texas, Colonel William Travis issues a call for help on behalf of the Texan troops defending the Alamo, an old Spanish mission and fortress under attack by the Mexican army. A native of Alabama, Travis moved to the Mexican state of Texas in 1831. He soon became a leader of the growing movement to overthrow the Mexican government and establish an independent Texan republic. When the Texas revolution began in 1835, Travis became a lieutenant-colonel in the revolutionary army and was given command of troops in the recently captured city of San Antonio de Bexar (now San Antonio). On February 23, 1836, a large Mexican force commanded by General Antonio Lopez de Santa Ana arrived suddenly in San Antonio. Travis and his troops took shelter in the Alamo, where they were soon joined by a volunteer force led by Colonel James Bowie.

Feb 25, 1964
Clay knocks out Liston. On February 25, 1964, 22-year-old Cassius Clay shocks the odds-makers by dethroning world heavyweight boxing champ Sonny Liston in a seventh-round technical knockout. The dreaded Liston, who had twice demolished former champ Floyd Patterson in one round, was an 8-to-1 favorite. However, Clay predicted victory, boasting that he would "float like a butterfly, sting like a bee" and knock out Liston in the eighth round. The fleet-footed and loquacious youngster needed less time to make good on his claim--Liston, complaining of an injured shoulder, failed to answer the seventh-round bell. A few moments later, a new heavyweight champion was proclaimed. Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. was born in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1942. He started boxing when he was 12 and by age 18 had amassed a record of over 100 wins in amateur competition. In 1959, he won the International Golden Gloves heavyweight title and in 1960 a gold medal in the light heavyweight category at the Summer Olympic Games in Rome. Clay turned professional after the Olympics and went undefeated in his first 19 bouts, earning him the right to challenge Sonny Liston, who had defeated Floyd Patterson in 1962 to win the heavyweight title.

Feb 26, 1919
Two national parks preserved, 10 years apart.On this day in history, two national parks were established in the United States 10 years apart--the Grand Canyon in 1919 and the Grand Tetons in 1929. Located in northwestern Arizona, the Grand Canyon is the product of millions of years of excavation by the mighty Colorado River. The chasm is exceptionally deep, dropping more than a mile into the earth, and is 15 miles across at its widest point. The canyon is home to more than 1,500 plant species and over 500 animal species, many of them endangered or unique to the area, and it's steep, multi-colored walls tell the story of 2 billion years of Earth's history. In 1540, members of an expedition sent by the Spanish explorer Coronado became the first Europeans to discover the canyon, though because of its remoteness the area was not further explored until 300 years later. American geologist John Wesley Powell, who popularized the term "Grand Canyon" in the 1870s, became the first person to journey the entire length of the gorge in 1869. The harrowing voyage was made in four rowboats.