City Island Issues

Category

HANG ON RUTHIE

Solution

A Supreme Court Justice is having a difficult time with The Donald and his outrageous ways and means. Hang on Ruthie... Let's hope Ruthie hangs on, as she speaks THE TRUTH AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH. https://youtu.be/Nuw8GJbqx94?list=RDNuw8GJbqx94

Did Ruth Bader Ginsburg cross the line with her comments on Donald Trump? http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/ruth-bader-ginsburg-donald-trump_us_... via @HuffPostPol

Ginsburg Is Horrified By Possible Trump Presidency http://nbcnews.to/29IeLWT via @nbcnews

HOW MANY DEATHS?

News

An endless number of men, women and children have already perished. These refugees are forgotten victims of fatal ocean accidents, according to UN High Commissioner for Refugees.

This Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees was established on December 14, 1950 by the United Nations General Assembly.

The agency is mandated to lead and co-ordinate international action to protect refugees and resolve refugee problems worldwide. Its primary purpose is to safeguard the rights and well-being of refugees.

8 DEAD 2 BUILDINGS DESTROYED

News

A huge explosion and a fire destroyed two apartment buildings in upper Manhattan has left seven dead and almost 100 injured, according to public safety officials.

This Week in Her and History

News

This Week in History, Aug 3 - Aug 9

Aug 03, 1958
Nautilus travels under North Pole. On August 3, 1958, the U.S. nuclear submarine Nautilus accomplishes the first undersea voyage to the geographic North Pole. The world's first nuclear submarine, the Nautilus dived at Point Barrow, Alaska, and traveled nearly 1,000 miles under the Arctic ice cap to reach the top of the world. It then steamed on to Iceland, pioneering a new and shorter route from the Pacific to the Atlantic and Europe.

Aug 04, 1944

WEATHER WARNINGS

Announcement
Images: 

A heat advisory has been posted and REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 8 PM EDT THURSDAY...

* LOCATIONS...NEW YORK CITY.

* HAZARDS...HIGH HEAT AND HUMIDITY.

* HEAT INDEX VALUES...IN THE MIDDLE TO UPPER 90S DUE TO TEMPERATURES FROM AROUND 90 TO THE MIDDLE 90S...AND DEWPOINTS FROM THE MIDDLE 60S TO AROUND 70.

* TIMING...DURING THE AFTERNOON HOURS TODAY AND THURSDAY.

* IMPACTS...PROLONGED EXPOSURE TO HIGH HEAT AND HUMIDITY WILL RESULT IN HEAT EXHAUSTION OR HEAT STROKE.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A HEAT ADVISORY IS ISSUED FOR NEW YORK CITY WHEN THE COMBINATION

AMERICAN MUSEUM QUIZ

Issue

It's an election year and Congress is poised to make some key decisions that will certainly affect museums, especially nonprofit, 501(c)(3) organizations.

The U.S. Internal Revenue Service says that nonprofits "generally are permitted to engage in advocacy or lobbying related to their exempt purposes," although there are some rules to follow.

AAM has developed a true/false quiz to test your knowledge about how nonprofit museums are allowed to get involved during this election season. Good luck!

Museum is allowed to publicize Election Day.

Repeal w/o Replace?

Problem

Millions may find themselves without affordable healthcare if Congres gets its way throughout The USA.

While most Americans were sleeping, US legislators took a first step dismantling President Barack Obama's health care law, responding to pressure to move quickly even as Republicans and President-elect Trump grapple with how to replace it.

After debating for hours through the wee hours of the night, US Senators voted towards a top goal of congressional Republicans and President-elect Donald Trump.

This Week in Her and History

News

This Week in History, Jan 12 - Jan 18

Jan 12, 1926
Original Amos 'n' Andy debuts on Chicago radio. On this day in 1926, the two-man comedy series "Sam 'n' Henry" debuts on Chicago's WGN radio station. Two years later, after changing its name to "Amos 'n' Andy," the show became one of the most popular radio programs in American history. Though the creators and the stars of the new radio program, Freeman Gosden and Charles Carrell, were both white, the characters they played were two black men from the Deep South who moved to Chicago to seek their fortunes. By that time, white actors performing in dark stage makeup--or "blackface"--had been a significant tradition in American theater for over 100 years. Gosden and Carrell, both vaudeville performers, were doing a Chicago comedy act in blackface when an employee at the Chicago Tribune suggested they create a radio show.

Jan 13, 1128
Pope recognizes Knights Templar. On this day in 1128, Pope Honorius II grants a papal sanction to the military order known as the Knights Templar, declaring it to be an army of God. Led by the Frenchman Hughes de Payens, the Knights Templar organization was founded in 1118. Its self-imposed mission was to protect Christian pilgrims on their way to the Holy Land during the Crusades, the series of military expeditions aimed at defeating Muslims in Palestine. The Templars took their name from the location of their headquarters, at Jerusalem's Temple Mount. For a while, the Templars had only nine members, mostly due to their rigid rules. In addition to having noble birth, the knights were required to take strict vows of poverty, obedience and chastity. In 1127, new promotional efforts convinced many more noblemen to join the order, gradually increasing its size and influence.

Jan 14, 1875
Albert Schweitzer born. The theologian, musician, philosopher and Nobel Prize-winning physician Albert Schweitzer is born on this day in 1875 in Upper-Alsace, Germany (now Haut-Rhin, France). The son and grandson of ministers, Schweitzer studied theology and philosophy at the universities of Strasbourg, Paris and Berlin. After working as a pastor, he entered medical school in 1905 with the dream of becoming a missionary in Africa. Schweitzer was also an acclaimed concert organist who played professional engagements to earn money for his education. By the time he received his M.D. in 1913, the overachieving Schweitzer had published several books, including the influential The Quest for the Historical Jesus and a book on the composer Johann Sebastian Bach.

Jan 15, 1967
Packers face Chiefs in first Super Bowl. On this day in 1967, at the Los Angeles Coliseum, the Green Bay Packers beat the Kansas City Chiefs in the first-ever world championship game of American football. In the mid-1960s, the intense competition for players and fans between the National Football League (NFL) and the upstart American Football League (AFL) led to talks of a possible merger. It was decided that the winners of each league's championship would meet each year in a single game to determine the "world champion of football."

Jan 16, 1919
Prohibition takes effect. The 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, prohibiting the "manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors for beverage purposes," is ratified on this day in 1919 and becomes the law of the land. The movement for the prohibition of alcohol began in the early 19th century, when Americans concerned about the adverse effects of drinking began forming temperance societies. By the late 19th century, these groups had become a powerful political force, campaigning on the state level and calling for total national abstinence. In December 1917, the 18th Amendment, also known as the Prohibition Amendment, was passed by Congress and sent to the states for ratification.

Jan 17, 1950
Boston thieves pull off historic robbery. On this day in 1950, 11 men steal more than $2 million from the Brinks Armored Car depot in Boston, Massachusetts. It was the perfect crime--almost--as the culprits weren't caught until January 1956, just days before the statute of limitations for the theft expired. The robbery's mastermind was Anthony "Fats" Pino, a career criminal who recruited a group of 10 other men to stake out the depot for 18 months to figure out when it held the most money. Pino's men then managed to steal plans for the depot's alarm system, returning them before anyone noticed they were gone.

OBAMA WANTS CASTRO

News

President Obama will soon ask San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro to become the next Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, while the current Housing Secretary Shaun Donovan serves as his chosen Director for Office of Management and Budget.

Global deadly diseases

Problem

According to World Health Organization figures, the following are the most deadly diseases in the world. The first figure is the annual mortality rate and the following is the percentage of all deaths. For example, of 57 million total deaths worldwide, heart disease accounts for more than 12.8%

Ischaemic heart disease 7.25 million 12.8%