TOMORROW'S WORLD

Attraction

Tomorrow's World: The New York World’s Fairs and Flushing Meadows in Corona Park. In celebration of the 50th and 75th anniversaries of the World’s Fairs, Tomorrow’s World will include never before exhibited vintage images from the Parks Photo Archive and private collections that illustrate the dynamic evolution and conversion of a vast industrial wasteland into New York City's fourth largest park. The World’s Fairs propelled this transformation, while serving as defining social and cultural events for two generations. The show will also include memorabilia, as well as two zodiac animals from Paul Manship’s vandalized Armillary Sphere from the second fair.

This exhibition is free and open to the public.

Arsenal in Central Park
830 Fifth Avenue
Open 9am-5pm, weekdays, thru 8/27
FREE

This Week in Her and History

News

This Week in History, Aug 17 - Aug 23

August 17, 1933
Lou Gehrig goes all the way. On August 17, 1933, New York Yankees first baseman Lou Gehrig plays in his 1,308th consecutive game, breaking former Yankee Everett Scott’s record for consecutive games played. Gehrig would go on to play in 2,130 games in a row, setting a record that would stand for over half a century. Henry Louis Gehrig was born June 19, 1903, in New York City, the only child of German immigrants to survive childhood illness. His doting parents stressed education over sports, and he attended Columbia University on a football scholarship and studied engineering. After his freshman year, Gehrig played for New York Giants Manager John McGraw in a summer league under the name Henry Lewis; he lost a year of eligibility at Columbia when his ruse was discovered. Gehrig was then signed by a Yankees scout while playing first base at Columbia, much to the consternation of Giants fans who believed their skipper had let the talented slugger get away. Gehrig joined the Yankees in 1923, but didn’t see any action until 1925. According to legend, Gehrig stepped in at first base when star Wally Pipp benched himself with a headache. Gehrig didn’t miss a game for the next 13 years, and Pipp never made it back on to the field. To this day, to be "Wally Pipped" is to be replaced for good. Next door in New Rochelle, there is a street along shore road renamed Lou Gehrig Way.

Aug 18, 1991
Soviet hard-liners launch coup against Gorbachev. On this day in 1991, Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev is placed under house arrest during a coup by high-ranking members of his own government, military and police forces. Since becoming secretary of the Communist Party in 1985 and president of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) in 1988, Gorbachev had pursued comprehensive reforms of the Soviet system. Combining perestroika ("restructuring") of the economy--including a greater emphasis on free-market policies--and glasnost ("openness") in diplomacy, he greatly improved Soviet relations with Western democracies, particularly the United States. Meanwhile, though, within the USSR, Gorbachev faced powerful critics, including conservative, hard-line politicians and military officials who thought he was driving the Soviet Union toward its downfall and making it a second-rate power. On the other side were even more radical reformers--particularly Boris Yeltsin, president of the most powerful socialist republic, Russia--who complained that Gorbachev was just not working fast enough.