This Week in History

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This Week in History, Apr 8 - Apr 14

Apr 08, 1974
Aaron sets new home run record. Hank Aaron of the Atlanta Braves hits his 715th career home run, breaking Babe Ruth's legendary record of 714 homers. 53,775 people, the largest in the history of Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, was there that night to cheer when Aaron hit a 4th inning pitch off the Los Angeles Dodgers' Al Downing. However, as Aaron was an African American who had received death threats and racist hate mail during his pursuit of one of baseball's most distinguished records, the achievement was bittersweet.

Apr 09, 1865
Robert E. Lee surrenders. At Appomattox, Virginia, Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrenders his 28,000 troops to Union General Ulysses S. Grant, ending the American Civil War. He was forced to abandon the Confederate capital of Richmond, blocked from joining the surviving Confederate force in North Carolina, and harassed by Union cavalry, Lee may have had no other option.

Apr 10, 1866
ASPCA is founded as the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in New York City by philanthropist and diplomat Henry Bergh. In 1863, Bergh had been appointed by President Abraham Lincoln to a diplomatic post at the Russian court of Czar Alexander II. It was there that he was horrified to witness work horses beaten by their peasant drivers. En route back to America, a June 1865 visit to the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in London awakened his determination to secure a charter not only to incorporate the ASPCA but to exercise the power to arrest and prosecute violators of the law.

Apr 11, 1814
Napoleon Bonaparte, emperor of France and one of the greatest military leaders in history, abdicates the throne, and, in the Treaty of Fontainebleau, is banished to the Mediterranean island of Elba. The future emperor was born in Ajaccio, Corsica, on August 15, 1769. After attending military school, he fought during the French Revolution of 1789 and rapidly rose through the military ranks, leading French troops in a number of successful campaigns throughout Europe in the late 1700s. By 1799, he was the top of a military dictatorship. In 1804, he became emperor of France and continued to consolidate power through his military campaigns, so that by 1810 much of Europe came under his rule. Although Napoleon developed a reputation for being power-hungry and insecure, he is also credited with enacting a series of important political and social reforms that had a lasting impact on European society, including judiciary systems, constitutions, voting rights for all men and the end of feudalism. Additionally, he supported education, science and literature. His Code Napoleon, which codified key freedoms gained during the French Revolution, such as religious tolerance, remains the foundation of French civil law.

Apr 12, 1861
The Civil War begins.It was to become the bloodiest four years in American history, when Confederate shore batteries under General P.G.T. Beauregard open fire on Union-held Fort Sumter in South Carolina at Charleston Bay. During the next 34 hours, 50 Confederate guns and mortars launched more than 4,000 rounds at the poorly supplied fort. On April 13, U.S. Major Robert Anderson surrendered the fort. Two days later, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation calling for 75,000 volunteer soldiers to quell the Southern "insurrection."

Apr 13, 1997
21-year-old Tiger Woods wins the prestigious Masters Tournament by a record 12 strokes in Augusta, Georgia. It was Woods' first victory in one of golf's four major championships–the U.S. Open, the British Open, the PGA Championship, and the Masters–and the greatest performance by a professional golfer in more than a century. Now 15 years later, he is no longer the same golfer he was.

Apr 14, 1865
US President Abraham Lincoln is shot. John Wilkes Booth, an actor and Confederate sympathizer, fatally shoots President Lincoln at a play at Ford's Theater in Washington, D.C. The attack came only five days after Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered his massive army at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, effectively ending the American Civil War. The Maryland native born in 1838, who remained in the North during the war despite his Confederate sympathies, initially plotted to capture President Lincoln and take him to Richmond, the Confederate capital. However, on March 20, 1865, the day of the planned kidnapping, the president failed to appear at the spot where Booth and his six fellow conspirators lay in wait. Two weeks later, Richmond fell to Union forces.

CITY ISLAND EASTER SUNRISE CELEBRATION

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A couple of dozen locals gathered at Pelham Cemetery very early this morning for the annual City Island Easter Sunday Sunrise Celebration.

This informal ecumenical meeting was organized by Trinity United Methodist Church of City Island. Their Pastor, the Reverend Ezra Hongchang Yew and George Cavalieri led the prayer services to celebrate the hope and joy of Easter.

Mother nature provided wonderful weather and the City Island sunrise was truly spectacular, as the group prayed and sang religious hymns to celebrate the risen Christ.