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This Week in Her and History

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This Week in History, February 23 - March 1

Feb 23, 1945
U.S. flag raised on Iwo Jima. During the bloody Battle for Iwo Jima, U.S. Marines from the 3rd Platoon, E Company, 2nd Battalion, 28th Regiment of the 5th Division take the crest of Mount Suribachi, the island's highest peak and most strategic position, and raise the U.S. flag. Marine photographer Louis Lowery was with them and recorded the event. American soldiers fighting for control of Suribachi's slopes cheered the raising of the flag, and several hours later more Marines headed up to the crest with a larger flag. Joe Rosenthal, a photographer with the Associated Press, met them along the way and recorded the raising of the second flag along with a Marine still photographer and a motion-picture cameraman.

Feb 24, 1836
Alamo defenders call for help. On this day in 1836, in San Antonio, Texas, Colonel William Travis issues a call for help on behalf of the Texan troops defending the Alamo, an old Spanish mission and fortress under attack by the Mexican army. A native of Alabama, Travis moved to the Mexican state of Texas in 1831. He soon became a leader of the growing movement to overthrow the Mexican government and establish an independent Texan republic. When the Texas revolution began in 1835, Travis became a lieutenant-colonel in the revolutionary army and was given command of troops in the recently captured city of San Antonio de Bexar (now San Antonio). On February 23, 1836, a large Mexican force commanded by General Antonio Lopez de Santa Ana arrived suddenly in San Antonio. Travis and his troops took shelter in the Alamo, where they were soon joined by a volunteer force led by Colonel James Bowie.

Feb 25, 1964
Clay knocks out Liston. On February 25, 1964, 22-year-old Cassius Clay shocks the odds-makers by dethroning world heavyweight boxing champ Sonny Liston in a seventh-round technical knockout. The dreaded Liston, who had twice demolished former champ Floyd Patterson in one round, was an 8-to-1 favorite. However, Clay predicted victory, boasting that he would "float like a butterfly, sting like a bee" and knock out Liston in the eighth round. The fleet-footed and loquacious youngster needed less time to make good on his claim--Liston, complaining of an injured shoulder, failed to answer the seventh-round bell. A few moments later, a new heavyweight champion was proclaimed. Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. was born in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1942. He started boxing when he was 12 and by age 18 had amassed a record of over 100 wins in amateur competition. In 1959, he won the International Golden Gloves heavyweight title and in 1960 a gold medal in the light heavyweight category at the Summer Olympic Games in Rome. Clay turned professional after the Olympics and went undefeated in his first 19 bouts, earning him the right to challenge Sonny Liston, who had defeated Floyd Patterson in 1962 to win the heavyweight title.

Feb 26, 1919
Two national parks preserved, 10 years apart.On this day in history, two national parks were established in the United States 10 years apart--the Grand Canyon in 1919 and the Grand Tetons in 1929. Located in northwestern Arizona, the Grand Canyon is the product of millions of years of excavation by the mighty Colorado River. The chasm is exceptionally deep, dropping more than a mile into the earth, and is 15 miles across at its widest point. The canyon is home to more than 1,500 plant species and over 500 animal species, many of them endangered or unique to the area, and it's steep, multi-colored walls tell the story of 2 billion years of Earth's history. In 1540, members of an expedition sent by the Spanish explorer Coronado became the first Europeans to discover the canyon, though because of its remoteness the area was not further explored until 300 years later. American geologist John Wesley Powell, who popularized the term "Grand Canyon" in the 1870s, became the first person to journey the entire length of the gorge in 1869. The harrowing voyage was made in four rowboats.

$185 MILLION FOR HOMELAND SECURITY

News

New York has received over $185 million in state and federal homeland security grants to municipalities across New York State. The funding will support critical infrastructure protection, sustain anti-terrorism programs in New York City, and enhance core emergency preparedness and response functions in counties statewide.

NEWS QUICKIE

Other

MEDITERRANEAN TRAGEDIES CONTINUE
Save the Children says dozens of passengers fell out of their rubber boat and likely drowned before rescue.

KERRY VISITS SOMALIA
US Secretary of State shows solidarity with that government trying to defeat al-Qaida militants.

REFORMING BALTIMORE COPS
Can city implement change without a full-fledged US justice Department civil rights investigation?

MILITARY JOINT CHIEFS CHAIR TO BE MARINE GENERAL
General Joseph Dunford Jr. was chosen top U.S. military commander in Afghanistan.

RIHANNA'S MET GALA CARPET WALK

VP DEBATE

Other

It was two cats in a bag, with no defense from Mike Pence and no more mister nice guy causing the GOP political pain from Tim Kaine.

Magic Mike tried to make all the outrageous comments The Donald made disappear. Perhaps he has a memory deficit.

6 things Trump definitely said that Pence claimed he didn’t http://politi.co/2dQeF0O

All the things Mike Pence said Donald Trump didn't say, he did. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/mike-pence-trump-didnt-say_us_57f497...

CITY ISLAND THEATER GROUP

Issue

THE STORY: PROOF

NYC Street Closures

News

There will be No Parking in the following areas from Tuesday, December 31st at 12:01 a.m. until 1:00 a.m. on Wednesday, January 1st:
All cross-town streets from 33rd to 59th Street between 6th and 8th Avenue;
West side of 5th Avenue, from 37th to 52nd Streets;
West side of 6th Avenue, from 34th to 59th Streets;
East side of 6th Avenue, from 37th to 52nd Streets;
East side of 8th Avenue from 34th to 57th Streets;
48th Street between 5th and Ninth Avenues;
43rd Street between 5th and 8th Avenue;
42nd Street between 5th and 9th Avenue;
37th Street between 5th and 8th Avenue;

The Pulitzer Prizes * 2014

News

2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners

Winning stories, photographs and cartoons, as well as bios and photos of winners, are available on the website listed below.

Journalism

PUBLIC SERVICE - Two Prizes: The Guardian US and The Washington Post

BREAKING NEWS REPORTING - The Boston Globe Staff

INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING - Chris Hamby of The Center for Public Integrity, Washington, D.C.

EXPLANATORY REPORTING - Eli Saslow of The Washington Post

LOCAL REPORTING - Will Hobson and Michael LaForgia of the Tampa Bay Times

This Week in Her and History

News

This Week in History, Sep 7 - Sep 13

Sep 07, 1813
United States nicknamed Uncle Sam. On this day in 1813, the United States gets its nickname, Uncle Sam. The name is linked to Samuel Wilson, a meat packer from Troy, New York, who supplied barrels of beef to the United States Army during the War of 1812. Wilson (1766-1854) stamped the barrels with "U.S." for United States, but soldiers began referring to the grub as "Uncle Sam's." The local newspaper picked up on the story and Uncle Sam eventually gained widespread acceptance as the nickname for the U.S. federal government.

Sep 08, 1974
Ford pardons Nixon. In a controversial executive action, President Gerald Ford pardons his disgraced predecessor Richard Nixon for any crimes he may have committed or participated in while in office. Ford later defended this action before the House Judiciary Committee, explaining that he wanted to end the national divisions created by the Watergate scandal.

Sep 09, 1893
President's child born in White House. In a controversial executive action, President Gerald Ford pardons his disgraced predecessor Richard Nixon for any crimes he may have committed or participated in while in office. Ford later defended this action before the House Judiciary Committee, explaining that he wanted to end the national divisions created by the Watergate scandal.

Sep 10, 1897
First drunk driving arrest. On this day in 1897, a 25-year-old London taxi driver named George Smith becomes the first person ever arrested for drunk driving after slamming his cab into a building. Smith later pled guilty and was fined 25 shillings. In the United States, the first laws against operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol went into effect in New York in 1910. In 1936, Dr. Rolla Harger, a professor of biochemistry and toxicology, patented the Drunkometer, a balloon-like device into which people would breathe to determine whether they were inebriated. In 1953, Robert Borkenstein, a former Indiana state police captain and university professor who had collaborated with Harger on the Drunkometer, invented the Breathalyzer. Easier-to-use and more accurate than the Drunkometer, the Breathalyzer was the first practical device and scientific test available to police officers to establish whether someone had too much to drink. A person would blow into the Breathalyzer and it would gauge the proportion of alcohol vapors in the exhaled breath, which reflected the level of alcohol in the blood.

Sep 11, 2001
Attack on America. At 8:45 a.m. on a clear Tuesday morning, an American Airlines Boeing 767 loaded with 20,000 gallons of jet fuel crashes into the north tower of the World Trade Center in New York City. The impact left a gaping, burning hole near the 80th floor of the 110-story skyscraper, instantly killing hundreds of people and trapping hundreds more in higher floors. As the evacuation of the tower and its twin got underway, television cameras broadcasted live images of what initially appeared to be a freak accident. Then, 18 minutes after the first plane hit, a second Boeing 767--United Airlines Flight 175--appeared out of the sky, turned sharply toward the World Trade Center, and sliced into the south tower at about the 60th floor. The collision caused a massive explosion that showered burning debris over surrounding buildings and the streets below. America was under attack. The attackers were Islamic terrorists from Saudi Arabia and several other Arab nations. Reportedly financed by Saudi fugitive Osama bin Laden's al Qaeda terrorist organization, they were allegedly acting in retaliation for America's support of Israel, its involvement in the Persian Gulf War, and its continued military presence in the Middle East. Some of the terrorists had lived in the United States for more than a year and had taken flying lessons at American commercial flight schools. Others had slipped into the U.S. in the months before September 11 and acted as the "muscle" in the operation. The 19 terrorists easily smuggled box-cutters and knives through security at three East Coast airports and boarded four flights bound for California, chosen because the planes were loaded with fuel for the long transcontinental journey. Soon after takeoff, the terrorists commandeered the four planes and took the controls, transforming the ordinary commuter jets into guided missiles.
As millions watched in horror the events unfolding in New York, American Airlines Flight 77 circled over downtown Washington and slammed into the west side of the Pentagon military headquarters at 9:45 a.m. Jet fuel from the Boeing 757 caused a devastating inferno that led to a structural collapse of a portion of the giant concrete building. All told, 125 military personnel and civilians were killed in the Pentagon along with all 64 people aboard the airliner. Less than 15 minutes after the terrorists struck the nerve center of the U.S. military, the horror in New York took a catastrophic turn for the worse when the south tower of the World Trade Center collapsed in a massive cloud of dust and smoke. The structural steel of the skyscraper, built to withstand winds in excess of 200 mph and a large conventional fire, could not withstand the tremendous heat generated by the burning jet fuel. At 10:30 a.m., the other Trade Center tower collapsed. Close to 3,000 people died in the World Trade Center and its vicinity, including a staggering 343 firefighters and paramedics, 23 New York City police officers, and 37 Port Authority police officers who were struggling to complete an evacuation of the buildings and save the office workers trapped on higher floors. Only six people in the World Trade Center towers at the time of their collapse survived. Almost 10,000 other people were treated for injuries, many severe. Meanwhile, a fourth California-bound plane--United Flight 93--was hijacked about 40 minutes after leaving Newark International Airport in New Jersey. Because the plane had been delayed in taking off, passengers on board learned of events in New York and Washington via cell phone and Airfone calls to the ground. Knowing that the aircraft was not returning to an airport as the hijackers claimed, a group of passengers and flight attendants planned an insurrection. One of the passengers, Thomas Burnett, Jr., told his wife over the phone that "I know we're all going to die. There's three of us who are going to do something about it. I love you, honey." Another passenger--Todd Beamer--was heard saying "Are you guys ready? Let's roll" over an open line. Sandy Bradshaw, a flight attendant, called her husband and explained that she had slipped into a galley and was filling pitchers with boiling water. Her last words to him were "Everyone's running to first class. I've got to go. Bye." The passengers fought the four hijackers and are suspected to have attacked the cockpit with a fire extinguisher. The plane then flipped over and sped toward the ground at upwards of 500 miles per hour, crashing in a rural field in western Pennsylvania at 10:10 a.m. All 45 people aboard were killed. Its intended target is not known, but theories include the White House, the U.S. Capitol, the Camp David presidential retreat in Maryland, or one of several nuclear power plants along the eastern seaboard. At 7 p.m., President George W. Bush, who had spent the day being shuttled around the country because of security concerns, returned to the White House. At 9 p.m., he delivered a televised address from the Oval Office, declaring "Terrorist attacks can shake the foundations of our biggest buildings, but they cannot touch the foundation of America. These acts shatter steel, but they cannot dent the steel of American resolve." In a reference to the eventual U.S. military response he declared: "We will make no distinction between the terrorists who committed these acts and those who harbor them." Operation Enduring Freedom, the U.S.-led international effort to oust the Taliban regime in Afghanistan and destroy Osama bin Laden's terrorist network based there, began on October 7, 2001. Bin Laden was killed during a raid of his compound in Pakistan by U.S. forces on May 2, 2011.

Most Beautiful Baby

Idea

CITY IMAGES is launching the most adorable baby contest and we invite all our readers to share their prettiest and, most beautiful baby photos.

Then, during the holidays, we will allow time for all of you to weigh in and help us decide which is the cutest baby!

Send the photos to CITY IMAGES and then cast your vote for the Internet's favorite little prince and princess, and help crown the Cutest Baby on cyberspace! Everyone can vote up to three times. The baby boy and baby girl winners will each receive gift card and be featured in DOSE OF NEWS: www.doseofnews.com. Voting ends December 24 at midnight.

Choosing a name for an infant is complicated. Not only should it sound right with the family name but future nicknames, both good and bad need to be taken into consideration.

A name might honor a favorite grandparent, but it will also have a forgotten meaning to be unearthed in books, and dubious modern associations to be checked on Google.

Once baby has a name, the next step is to show photos to everyone. Thant's where we come in, so just Do IT.

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Eating Cable?

Other

In Spanish, we have a saying "Comerse Un Cable" and for those who read the language of romance, here's a link: http://www.asihablamos.com/word/palabra/Comerse%20un%20cable.php

It means eating cable, or having problems and experiencing economic difficulties. The term is appropriate when referring to the cable industry, which is apparently eating cable.

Cable TV Alternatives - A Guide to Cutting the Cord https://shar.es/1FzL1Y